Lesson #194 Redux: The Teddy Bears’ Picnic

The summer after I started this blog, I came across a website that looked at the more disturbing second verses of common childhood verses and songs that we all know. Today, I learned the later verses to the Teddy Bears’ Picnic, and wow are they sinister.

The second verse is innocuous enough,

“Every Teddy Bear who’s been good is sure of a treat today. There’s lots of marvelous things to eat and wonderful games to play.”

But then it suddenly takes a really dark turn in the third (and final) verse:

“If you go down in the woods today, you’d better not go alone. It’s lovely down in the woods today, but better to stay at home.”

WTF?!?

Nothing says childhood trauma like “your teddy bears sometimes come to life, get together in the woods for a picnic, and eat the children who follow them.”

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2 thoughts on “Lesson #194 Redux: The Teddy Bears’ Picnic

  1. Bruce Kaplan says:

    My father in law, Val Rosing was the singer on the original BBC recording of Teddy Bears Picnic. He also recorded the somewhat threatening “Hush Hush Hush, here comes the Boogey Man.” My wife Claudia says that the purpose of the song was to scare little children so they would not get out of bed at night!

    • disquisitive says:

      That’s terrifying!

      That said, my fear that G’mork (the Nothing’s emissary in ‘The Neverending Story’) was hiding under my bed was what kept me in bed as a child.

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